© 2018 by WRAD & The Lookout

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P 1300 009 723   |   F 5564 5700

172 Merri Street Warrnambool Victoria 3280

About Us

WRAD has determined there is a clear need for a local residential rehabilitation service. WRAD has the necessary skills, expertise, and standing in the community to address this issue and we have received strong support during local consultations. Other groups in the GSC, including the Western Victoria Primary Health Network, have also prioritised the need for a residential rehabilitation as part of their planning process.

 

We envisage a 20-bed facility in or near Warrnambool. It will be staffed 24 hours, 7 days a week. Clients will be housed in private bedrooms, and there will be a common room, recreation space, and counselling offices, in addition to kitchen and dining rooms and bathrooms. The grounds will include produce gardens to foster service sustainability and recreation facilities for skill development.

By establishing a residential rehabilitation centre, WRAD as the lead agency in the Great South Coast Drug Treatment Consortium, will add to the existing complement of alcohol and other drugs, other health and welfare services that strive to improve the lives of those in need of specialist care and support.

A Residential Rehabilitation Planning and Fundraising Committee includes local leaders with a strong track record of working to advance community well-being. The committee is chaired by Glenys Phillpot who is joined by Sue Cassidy, Tracey Kol, Matty Stewart, John Rantall and Greg Best.

 

WRAD Committee

Rob Coffey

Now retired, Robert was born and raised in Warrnambool. Graduated from Melbourne University and worked as a secondary school teacher in Geelong for 10 years before returning home to the family abalone business.

 

Robert was previously president of Apex Victoria where he was heavily involved in organising debating competitions.

 

He is now a Rotary member, including a three-year stint as Assistant District Governor.

Robert joined the WRAD Committee of Management in 2010. He was also a former member of the Brauer College School Council and President of Warrnambool East Primary School Council. He is currently President of The City of Warrnambool Eisteddfod Society.

 

He said that developing the Lookout Residential Rehabilitation Centre would add another successful treatment model to support local people.

“Like most addiction therapies, it will definitely work for some people who require that 24-7 support,” Robert said.

 

Robert is married to Robyn and they have three daughters and one grandson.

Helen Taylor

Helen came to Warrnambool in 1976 for what she expected to be a short stint of teaching and went on to have a career at Brauer College that lasted until her retirement as the assistant principal in 2009.

 

During her time at Brauer Helen was involved in a professional development program which included education for students on the safe use of alcohol and understanding drug addictions and mental illnesses.

She joined the WRAD Committee of Management in 1998 and has been Chair since 2006.

“WRAD is a very important body in our community and I’m really excited about the Lookout,” she says. “People with drug and alcohol problems are just normal people in our community and a residential rehabilitation can help them to resolve their issues.”

Helen and her husband John are parents of two children who live locally. Her eldest son Luke is also a WRAD board member.

Helen also runs short-stay accommodation in Warrnambool.

Tracey Kol

The opportunity to study communications and public relations at Deakin University attracted Tracey to Warrnambool in 1990.

Tracey came to love the city and after graduating worked with advertising agency RPM before moving to 3YB/Coast FM as an account manager. She is now sales manager for 3YB/Coast FM.

Tracey joined the WRAD Committee of Management in 2012 and says that experience has given her a good insight into the need for residential rehabilitation.

“My exposure on the WRAD committee of management to the problems we have in our community highlights the need for residential care,” Tracey says.


“There are many people in our region who would benefit from a local residential program.  At the moment there aren’t many opportunities in regional Victoria and a centre here would overcome the obstacle of travel.”

A mother of two children aged 19 and 21, Tracey enjoys living and being part of the Warrnambool community, and is dedicated to fitness and a healthy lifestyle.

Carolyn Monaghan

As a pharmacist, Carolyn has seen major changes in dispensing prescription medication.

 

Carolyn and her husband Lindsay, also a pharmacist, moved to Warrnambool in 1982 to purchase Thomas’ Pharmacy. They ran the business for 20 years until retiring in 2000. Carolyn continued to do relief work after that.

 

“I’m very concerned about the number of prescription opiates being used,” Carolyn said.

“It used to be that 30 per cent of deaths from opiates were from legal prescriptions; 70 per cent illegal but now that’s reversed.”

 

“It’s a major concern and that’s why I support the residential rehabilitation centre. The perception in the community is that we have a big problem with ice but in most cases, it’s not criminals; it’s normal people who have problems with prescriptions and alcohol. It can happen to anyone.”

 

Carolyn has been on the WARD Committee of Management since 2012.

 

She was involved in establishing Business and Professional Women in Warrnambool was in Rotary and the hospital auxiliary and cares for her father and two cats.

Luke Taylor

Luke joined the WRAD Committee of Management in 2011, replacing James Nicol as a representative of Warrnambool’s legal fraternity.

Luke grew up in Warrnambool and studied in Geelong before returning to work.  Luke spent time away on working holiday to Europe between 2007 and 2009 before returning to the city to join Tait’s Legal. He became a partner of the firm in 2013.

As a father of three children, Luke sees his future in Warrnambool. “It has a good family atmosphere and community-minded people,” he says.

He says the Lookout will address distance problems.  “People are not seeking assistance because they are located too far away from residential rehab services and the waiting lists are too long.  Being isolated makes a tremendously hard experience even harder.”

 

Luke would like to see people becoming engaged in rehabilitation programs outside of court orders. “Unless we have those opportunities here it becomes challenging,” he says.

Glenys Phillpot

Glenys, OAM, is chair of the Lookout Steering Committee and has been on the WRAD Committee of Management since 1999.

 

A former Warrnambool City Councillor for 13 years, including four terms as Mayor and part of its current health and well-being advisory committee, Glenys was also on the Deakin University Council for four years and is involved with Beyond the Bell and Warrnambool Historical Society.

 

Glenys worked in financial planning and superannuation at Sinclair Wilson for 20 years and she and her husband Bill have five children and 12 grandchildren.

 

About 20 years ago Glenys joined the WRAD Committee. “I could see an increasing issue in our community and little did I know that it would spiral out of control,” she said.


“The Lookout Residential Rehabilitation Centre would be another part of the jigsaw in addressing these issues. I’m a firm believer in `our community; our problem’ and we all need to get behind the Lookout project.”

 

Glenys is a Director of Peter's Project.

Scott Dickie

Scott joined the WRAD Committee of Management as Treasurer 18 months ago and has continued to provide similar services for the Lookout Committee.

 

Raised in Warrnambool, Scott studied accounting at the then Warrnambool Institute of Advanced Education (now Deakin University).  After graduating, he worked in Melbourne for 11 years before returning 17 years ago with his partner to raise their two young sons in Warrnambool.

 

He is now tax accounting partner at Sinclair Wilson.

 

Scott says he is impressed by how the community has come together so quickly to fund and support the proposed Lookout centre.

 

“The Lookout will have such a benefit to the community and will make an important impact on people’s life who need this type of support,” he said.

Shane Keogh

Senior Sergeant Shane Keogh has been based in Warrnambool for 18 years and his career in Victoria Police dates back 33 years. He is the current Station Commander of the Warrnambool police station.

 

Shane followed his predecessor, Senior Sergeant Ian Armstrong, on to the WRAD Committee of Management and backs plans for more support services in the region.

 

“We’ve tried everything else; residential rehab is the way to go,” Shane said.  “There are some issues with pharmaceutical and illicit drugs, but our biggest issue in this region is alcohol,” he added. “A residential rehab service will help people to deal with these problems.”

 

Married with four children, Shane likes to golf and fishing in his free time.

WRAD Management Team

Geoff Soma

Director

Dawn Bermingham

Finance Manager

 

Daryl Fitzgibbon

Operations Manager

Dr Sue Richardson

Senior Medical officer

Chris Kendall

Clinical Staff Coordinator

 

Angela Alexander

Sliding doors day program coordinator

 

Lookout Steering Committee

Tracey Kol

The opportunity to study communications and public relations at Deakin University attracted Tracey to Warrnambool in 1990.

Tracey came to love the city and after graduating worked with advertising agency RPM before moving to 3YB/Coast FM as an account manager. She is now sales manager for 3YB/Coast FM.

Tracey joined the WRAD Committee of Management in 2012 and says that experience has given her a good insight into the need for residential rehabilitation.

“My exposure on the WRAD committee of management to the problems we have in our community highlights the need for residential care,” Tracey says.


“There are many people in our region who would benefit from a local residential program.  At the moment there aren’t many opportunities in regional Victoria and a centre here would overcome the obstacle of travel.”

A mother of two children aged 19 and 21, Tracey enjoys living and being part of the Warrnambool community, and is dedicated to fitness and a healthy lifestyle.

Glenys Phillpot

Glenys, OAM, is chair of the Lookout Steering Committee and has been on the WRAD Committee of Management since 1999.

 

A former Warrnambool City Councillor for 13 years, including four terms as Mayor and part of its current health and well-being advisory committee, Glenys was also on the Deakin University Council for four years and is involved with Beyond the Bell and Warrnambool Historical Society.

 

Glenys worked in financial planning and superannuation at Sinclair Wilson for 20 years and she and her husband Bill have five children and 12 grandchildren.

 

About 20 years ago Glenys joined the WRAD Committee. “I could see an increasing issue in our community and little did I know that it would spiral out of control,” she said.


“The Lookout Residential Rehabilitation Centre would be another part of the jigsaw in addressing these issues. I’m a firm believer in `our community; our problem’ and we all need to get behind the Lookout project.”

Glenys is a Director of Peter's Project.

John Rantall

John might be best known as an AFL champion, but for 25 years he worked in alcohol and drug rehabilitation.

 

Now based in Noorat, John started his football career with Cobden before debuting with South Melbourne (now Sydney Swans) in 1963. After 260 games he moved to North Melbourne and was a member of the 1975 premiership team and the 1974 club best and fairest winner. He finished his 18-year, 336-game career with six games at Fitzroy in 1980. At the time he was the Victorian Football League games record holder.

 

After retiring from football, John moved to Queensland and worked as a recreational officer in alcohol and drug rehabilitation and later farmed in NSW.

 

John’s wife Deb took on the role of CEO at Abbeyfield based in Mortlake, prompting John to retire and return to his home area.

 

He says a residential rehabilitation centre would make a huge difference to the south-west.  “If it was close and people didn’t have to go out of the region to seek help, it makes it much easier.”

Sue Cassidy

Born in Terang, Sue went to school in Warrnambool and started her hairdressing apprenticeship when 16.

 

After living in England from 2000 to 2002, Sue opened Unisexcuts in 2003, and married David Cassidy in 2006.  

Sue’s many community involvements include Warrnambool Football / Netball Club board, the sub-committee for Peter’s Project fundraiser, Leadership Great South Coast, committee member for Business Professional Women South West, steering committee member for ICE project, Daybreak Rotary, and Board member for Lyndoch Living.

 

Sue was elected as a Warrnambool City Councillor in 2016.

 

“I had a lightbulb moment at the Ice Challenge day when I was talking to reformed addicts who had to be rehabilitated in their homes or on the street. I then said to WRAD Director Geoff Soma, why don’t we try for a rehab centre for drug and alcohol. When I ran for council, in my top three priorities was to advocate for a rehabilitation centre for our region.

Matty Stewart

Radio identity, business owner and mentor for young people, Matty has a strong connection to the Warrnambool community.

Matty presents a morning breakfast show for Coast FM, calls football and racing, owns Town and Country Pizza and runs the Standing Tall mentoring program for disengaged young people.

He was born and bred in Warrnambool and is passionate about his local community.

“My passion for the Lookout proposal follows on from being an ambassador for the Great South Coast ICE challenge,” he said. “There’s a need in our society for something like this to improve outcomes for local people.”

Matty is married with three children aged 4, 7 and 10.

Greg Best

Greg has been editor of The Standard for the past three years.

 

Born and raised locally, Greg started his journalism career at The Standard before moving to Melbourne and returned to The Standard 20 years ago.

 

He says people with drug and alcohol issues deserve a chance to get their lives back on track. “Education has to be the number one priority around the addiction to drugs and alcohol.  It happens to anyone and we need to have things such as the residential rehabilitation centre in place to help support people overcome addictions to alcohol, prescription drugs or illicit drugs. We can’t just keep locking people up.”

 
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